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Neudies - Nipes

by Neudies
Regular price $59.00
Unit price
per

Born in Neu York
12 cm | 5 in
120 grams | 4.2 oz
Super soft premium vinyl
Curious, optimistic, witty, fun

Care instructions
Keep neudies away from direct sunlight
Give neudies company
The more you give, the more you get

Ideas
Start a conversation
Make a friend happy
Show your love to your lover

Ever wondered why toys don’t have genitals?

It’s no secret that sex is all around us, but somehow it’s still uncomfortable and a little weird to talk about genitals. There is a rooted sense of shame in genitals that is directly linked to censorship. It’s an arbitrary kind of censorship that urges sex and shames our bodies at the same time. It’s no wonder we have a tough time talking about nudity.

In 2018, a pair of siblings in New York City asked themselves a revolutionary question, “Can we disrupt the way we see and talk about genitals?”
The siblings wondered how they could portray genitals in a completely different light. One that would incite conversation and distance shame from the equation. In one of these conversations, the idea of the lack of genitals in toys came up. They decided to reinvent these “missing parts” and turn genitals into protagonists.

This brother and sister duo developed the Neudies by combining their love for art, design, and storytelling with the goal of bringing people together and encouraging authentic conversations. “We are challenging censorship and cultural norms because we want to open up a conversation that normalizes genitals.”

Neudies - Nipes

by Neudies
Regular price $59.00
Unit price
per
Buy now, pay later with Afterpay
Fast Shipping
Availability
 
(0 in cart)
Shipping calculated at checkout.

Born in Neu York
12 cm | 5 in
120 grams | 4.2 oz
Super soft premium vinyl
Curious, optimistic, witty, fun

Care instructions
Keep neudies away from direct sunlight
Give neudies company
The more you give, the more you get

Ideas
Start a conversation
Make a friend happy
Show your love to your lover

Ever wondered why toys don’t have genitals?

It’s no secret that sex is all around us, but somehow it’s still uncomfortable and a little weird to talk about genitals. There is a rooted sense of shame in genitals that is directly linked to censorship. It’s an arbitrary kind of censorship that urges sex and shames our bodies at the same time. It’s no wonder we have a tough time talking about nudity.

In 2018, a pair of siblings in New York City asked themselves a revolutionary question, “Can we disrupt the way we see and talk about genitals?”
The siblings wondered how they could portray genitals in a completely different light. One that would incite conversation and distance shame from the equation. In one of these conversations, the idea of the lack of genitals in toys came up. They decided to reinvent these “missing parts” and turn genitals into protagonists.

This brother and sister duo developed the Neudies by combining their love for art, design, and storytelling with the goal of bringing people together and encouraging authentic conversations. “We are challenging censorship and cultural norms because we want to open up a conversation that normalizes genitals.”